Recommended Reading October 2016

Recommended Reading October 2016

top5-regretsAfter too many years of unfulfilling work, Bronnie Ware began searching for a job with heart. Despite having no formal qualifications or experience, she found herself in palliative care. Over the years she spent tending to the needs of those who were dying, Bronnie’s life was transformed. Later, she wrote an Internet blog about the most common regrets expressed to her by the people she had cared for.

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dying-to-be-meIn this truly inspirational memoir, Anita Moorjani relates how, after fighting cancer for almost four years – her body overwhelmed by the malignant cells spreading throughout her system – began shutting down. As her organs failed, she entered into an extraordinary near-death experience where she realized her inherent worth . . . and the actual cause of her disease.

After years of struggling to forge her own path while trying to meet everyone else’s expectations, she had the realization, as a result of her epiphany on the other side, that she had the power to heal herself . . . and that there are miracles in the Universe that she had never even imagined.

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Recommended Reading September 2016

Recommended Reading September 2016

tibetan-book“This book represents an apex in human wisdom; it is a radiant gem transmitting the accumulated insights of centuries of Tibetan Buddhism.” Larry Dossey, MD

The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying is the ultimate introduction to Tibetan Buddhist wisdom. An enlightening, inspiring, and comforting manual for life and death that the New York Times calls, “The Tibetan equivalent of [Dante’s] The Divine Comedy,” this is the essential work that moved Huston Smith, author of The World’s Religions, to proclaim, “I have encountered no book on the interplay of life and death that is more comprehensive, practical, and wise.”

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lessons-of-loss

Lessons of Loss offers a novel perspective on grieving for both bereaved indivdiuals and professionals who try to help them.

In this readable book, author Dr. Neimeyer –

  • argues that traditional theories of grief are too superficial and simplistic
  • develops a fresh theory of grieving as a process of “meaning reconstruction”
  • uses actual stories of actual people struggling through loss
  • considers grieving as an active process of transformation
  • suggests ritualizing and memorializing the people and things we miss

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